Your Money NPR coverage of personal finance, money, investing, taxes, retirement, mortgages and housing markets, wealth management, and stock market news. Download NPR podcasts and RSS feeds.

Your Money

Costly hail storms and other disasters have contributed to a sharp rise in home and auto insurance premiums. A growing number of frustrated insurance customers are now shopping around in search of more affordable policies. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick T. Fallon/AFP

Double-digit price increases have people shopping for less expensive insurance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="/player/embed/nx-s1-4987948/nx-s1-0847927f-4ce7-48b0-a742-3d1130ee5f18" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A proposed new rule would ban medical debt from credit reports. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Medical debt announcement

  • Download
  • <iframe src="/player/embed/nx-s1-4998853/nx-s1-e00995bd-72c7-4b5b-b573-70f65c753870" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A strong dollar reinforces America's economic might and helps bring down inflation — but it also hurts exporters. Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images

Strong Dollar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="/player/embed/nx-s1-4990256/nx-s1-da436364-ebca-4a0e-bb6c-1daa8291eb4b" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sizzling summer temperatures are expected to drive electric bills higher this year. Nearly one in six families are already behind on their utility bills. Brendan Smialowski/AFP hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP

cooling costs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="/player/embed/nx-s1-4985082/nx-s1-2d10940b-5992-4402-8eca-12843bc2cb14" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Good Tape Studio

Karen McDonough sits inside her home in Quincy, Massachusetts. Vanessa Leroy for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Vanessa Leroy for NPR

Medical debt is as much a hallmark of having children as long nights and dirty diapers. The Crivilare family, Andrew, Heather and Rita, 2, are pictured at their kitchen table in Jacksonville, Ill. Neeta Satam for KFF Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Neeta Satam for KFF Health News

Their first baby came with medical debt. These Illinois parents won't have another.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="/player/embed/1250233411/1250321384" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Photo illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Want to lend a friend money? Ask yourself if you can afford to never see it again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="/player/embed/1248683940/1251306724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Social Security's finances have improved slightly in the last year. But benefits are still facing an automatic cut in less than a decade unless Congress takes steps to prop up the program. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

BYD electric cars wait to be loaded onto a ship at a port in Yantai, China, on April 18. China has rapidly become a major auto exporter, but tariffs have kept cheap Chinese EVs out of the U.S. market — so far. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
STR/AFP via Getty Images

China makes cheap electric vehicles. Why can't American shoppers buy them?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="/player/embed/1248065838/1249130966" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Iowa recently became the fourth Republican-led state to ban spending public money on basic income programs that do not have a work requirement. olando_o/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
olando_o/Getty Images

After a boom in cash aid to tackle poverty, some states are now banning it

  • Download
  • <iframe src="/player/embed/1248663386/1248863483" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rhaina Cohen and her husband live in a row house with another couple and their two children in Washington, D.C. Cohen says they wanted to share a home with people who they were excited to live with — and who they could depend on. From left to right: Cohen, her husband, her housemate's child and her housemate. Rhaina Cohen hide caption

toggle caption
Rhaina Cohen

The medical device maker Philips has agreed to a $1.1 billion settlement to address claims brought by thousands of people with sleep apnea who say they were injured by the company's CPAP machines. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Some baby boomers would like to downsize from their large homes, but say it doesn't make financial sense. Single-family homes in Dumfries, Va., are seen here last year. Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Many baby boomers own homes that are too big. Can they be enticed to sell them?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="/player/embed/1244171720/1246083039" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kitboga, a popular "scam baiter" who hides behind characters to waste the time of scammers, has a combined Twitch and YouTube following of more than million subscribers. His aviator sunglasses — a signature look — recall a comically disguised CIA agent. Kitboga on Twitch/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kitboga on Twitch/Screenshot by NPR

COVINGTON, KY - APRIL 8: Kathleen Malone works on tax returns at the Cincinnati Internal Revenue Service Center April 8, 2005 in Covington, Kentucky. The tax filing deadline is a week away. Mike Simons/Getty hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Simons/Getty

TikTok is filled with tax advice. Is any of it worth listening to?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="/player/embed/1197958760/1244490476" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news